Apple announcement brainstorming

A mysterious teaser appeared on apple.com today to announce an announcement happening tomorrow. Most people have landed in one of four prediction camps: the launch of cloud- or subscription-based iTunes, Beatles availability on iTunes, the release of iOS 4.2, or a small, insanely hyperbolized announcement to grab the attention of the media. And yes, it’ll probably be one of those four scenarios.

But what if it’s not? As an exercise in complete absurdity, here’s some wild speculation about what could (theoretically) happen tomorrow at 10 Eastern:

  • Live, streaming concert of a major band (let’s face it, it’d be U2)
  • Steve Jobs chats on FaceTime with caller #52 to a super-secret Apple number
  • A complete archive of every major TV show and movie ever
  • An MP3 option for iTunes downloads
  • A free MobileMe account with cloud syncing for every iTunes user
  • A Hulu competitor1 (iAd-supported streaming TV shows)
  • Steve Jobs announces a new product or service via live video from his office
  • iTunes for Android and/or WP7
  • A new super-simple way for independent musicians to submit songs
  • Steve Jobs goes Oprah: free iPod nanos for everyone!

I realize that half of the list above will never, ever, ever happen. Complete and utter absurdity, remember?

1 I’d say a Netflix competitor, too, but Apple seems to be pretty buddy-buddy with Netflix lately.

November 15, 2010 at 6:30 pm

Final thoughts on the Maine gubernatorial race

If you want to see what’s wrong with Maine, look no further than the gubernatorial race this year.

Maine’s a state that doesn’t know what it wants. We know we’re not in a good place right now, but we don’t know how to move forward. Many of our key industries (forest products, shoes, and more) have moved in large part overseas or to more business-friendly locales in North America. On top of that, we’re an aging state, and many of the people my age leave the state in order to find better jobs in places where the kind of jobs we want are more available.

Now look at this year’s gubernatorial race. The three serious contenders for the office have either worked in politics for decades or, in the case of LePage, help run a business that screams “old Maine.” Compared with the 2008 national election during which two charismatic forty-somethings – relative newcomers in politics – took center stage, the policies raised in Maine’s gubernatorial race make it seem like we’re stuck in the past.

Vision for the future, however, isn’t dependent on youth. Unfortunately, this year’s candidates seem to believe that we can find success by tweaking the Maine of yesteryear. We can shrink government. We can consolidate and reorganize schools. Those proposals don’t encourage students to stay in Maine after they’ve graduated. They don’t encourage businesses to be innovative and try new ways of making money. They’re just a way to console voters by saying, “We know it’s rough. But we’ll change some things, and it’ll be better.”

Our next governor needs to look beyond our past to find the solutions to the state’s problems. We need to encourage and invest in new ways of attracting new kinds of business to Maine. We need to support our wonderful tourism industry and allow people to visit our state easily and frequently. We need to support biotechnology, genetics, wind power engineering, call centers, and telecommuting. We have a beautiful state with a great way of life, and we need to use that to our advantage in every way we can.

Above all else we need to encourage young people to stay in the state after they graduate high school and college. We can reform our government and educational system all we want, but Maine can not keep losing its children. If we don’t encourage youth in our state, it will continue to grow harder to foster innovation and the change we need in Maine.

I’m a 27-year-old lifelong Mainer, and I was very disappointed by the choices in this year’s gubernatorial race. If we’re going to move Maine forward, a change in residency in the Blaine House isn’t going to be enough. We all need to do our part to make Maine better.

November 3, 2010 at 8:03 am

The order in which I would have voted for gubernatorial candidates had they appeared on the ballot

  1. Peter Mills
  2. Steve Abbott
  3. Rosa Scarcelli
  4. Steve Rowe
  5. Matt Jacobson
  6. Eliot Cutler
  7. Pat McGowan
  8. Libby Mitchell
  9. Shawn Moody
  10. Kevin Scott
  11. Paul LePage
  12. Bill Beardsley
  13. Bruce Poliquin
  14. Les Otten

I voted for Cutler. What’s your list look like?

November 2, 2010 at 8:02 pm

EvDaWriMo

For a number of years I’ve had three main pillars that I enjoy: web development, photography, and writing. Between my full-time job and a few projects I do on the side, I definitely keep my development interest going. I cover photography by going on day trips on the weekends; even though I don’t take as many photos as I did a few years ago, I still have the chance to explore and make my mind work in a creative way. Writing, however, is a different story; I haven’t focused on that lately, and I really miss it.

The month of November is National Novel Writing Month, known as NaNoWriMo. People who take part in NaNoWriMo strive to write a 50,000-word novel between November 1 and November 30. A few of my friends on Twitter are trying it out, and I wish them the best of luck. It’s a great challenge; as many writers say, the best way to improve your writing is to practice as much as you can.

I’ve never been much of a novel writer, though. One of my English teachers in high school told me that I did my best when writing concisely; I really struggle whenever I have to write anything over ten pages. I also haven’t written any real fiction since high school.

I might not have the determination to do NaNoWriMo, but I want to focus on writing in November. I’ve decided that I want to make it my goal to write something – anything – of at least 250 words every day in the month. It’s my EvDaWriMo, or every day of writing month. I might write a blog post over on our newly refreshed Sephone blog, a post at Another New World, a post here, or something on a couple of other ideas I have. I might even write some fiction. I’m not sure yet whether I’ll share everything I write, but the important part is that I just want to focus on writing for a bit.

Let’s go write!

The month of November is National Novel Writing Month, known as NaNoWriMo. People who take part in NaNoWriMo strive to write a 50,000-word novel between November 1 and November 30. A few of my friends on Twitter are trying it out, and I wish them the best of luck. It’s a great challenge; as many writers say, the best way to improve your writing is to practice as much as you can.
I’ve never been much of a novel writer, though. One of my English teachers in high school told me that I did my best when writing concisely; I really struggle whenever I have to write anything over ten pages. I also haven’t written any real fiction since high school.
I might not have the determination to do NaNoWriMo, but I want to focus on writing in November. I’ve decided that I want to make it my goal to write something – anything – of at least 250 words every day in the month. It’s my EvDaWriMo, or every day of writing month. I might write a blog post over on our <a href=”http://blog.sephone.com” target=”_blank”>newly refereshed Sephone blog</a>, a post at <a href=”http://www.anothernewworld.com” target=”_blank”>Another New World</a>, a post here, or something on a couple of other ideas I have. I might even write some fiction. I’m not sure yet whether I’ll share everything I write, but the important part is that I just want to focus on writing for a bit.
Let’s go write!a number of years I’ve had three main pillars that I enjoy: web development, photography, and writing. Between my full-time job and a few projects I do on the side, I definitely keep my development interest going. I cover photography by going on day trips on the weekends; even though I don’t take as many photos as I did a few years ago, I still have the chance to explore and make my mind work in a creative way. Writing, however, is a different story; I haven’t focused on that lately, and I really miss it.
The month of November is National Novel Writing Month, known as NaNoWriMo. People who take part in NaNoWriMo strive to write a 50,000-word novel between November 1 and November 30. A few of my friends on Twitter are trying it out, and I wish them the best of luck. It’s a great challenge; as many writers say, the best way to improve your writing is to practice as much as you can.
I’ve never been much of a novel writer, though. One of my English teachers in high school told me that I did my best when writing concisely; I really struggle whenever I have to write anything over ten pages. I also haven’t written any real fiction since high school.
I might not have the determination to do NaNoWriMo, but I want to focus on writing in November. I’ve decided that I want to make it my goal to write something – anything – of at least 250 words every day in the month. It’s my EvDaWriMo, or every day of writing month. I might write a blog post over on our <a href=”http://blog.sephone.com” target=”_blank”>newly refereshed Sephone blog</a>, a post at <a href=”http://www.anothernewworld.com” target=”_blank”>Another New World</a>, a post here, or something on a couple of other ideas I have. I might even write some fiction. I’m not sure yet whether I’ll share everything I write, but the important part is that I just want to focus on writing for a bit.
Let’s go write!For a number of years I’ve had three main pillars that I enjoy: web development, photography, and writing. Between my full-time job and a few projects I do on the side, I definitely keep my development interest going. I cover photography by going on day trips on the weekends; even though I don’t take as many photos as I did a few years ago, I still have the chance to explore and make my mind work in a creative way. Writing, however, is a different story; I haven’t focused on that lately, and I really miss it.
The month of November is National Novel Writing Month, known as NaNoWriMo. People who take part in NaNoWriMo strive to write a 50,000-word novel between November 1 and November 30. A few of my friends on Twitter are trying it out, and I wish them the best of luck. It’s a great challenge; as many writers say, the best way to improve your writing is to practice as much as you can.
I’ve never been much of a novel writer, though. One of my English teachers in high school told me that I did my best when writing concisely; I really struggle whenever I have to write anything over ten pages. I also haven’t written any real fiction since high school.
I might not have the determination to do NaNoWriMo, but I want to focus on writing in November. I’ve decided that I want to make it my goal to write something – anything – of at least 250 words every day in the month. It’s my EvDaWriMo, or every day of writing month. I might write a blog post over on our <a href=”http://blog.sephone.com” target=”_blank”>newly refereshed Sephone blog</a>, a post at <a href=”http://www.anothernewworld.com” target=”_blank”>Another New World</a>, a post here, or something on a couple of other ideas I have. I might even write some fiction. I’m not sure yet whether I’ll share everything I write, but the important part is that I just want to focus on writing for a bit.
Let’s go write!
November 1, 2010 at 9:23 pm